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André Derain

French Painter, Writer, Set Designer, Illustrator, and Sculptor

André Derain Photo
Movements and Styles: Fauvism, Divisionism, Cubism

Born: June 10, 1880 - Chatou, France

Died: September 8, 1954 - Garches, France

"For us Fauvism was like an ordeal by fire...our paints became sticks of dynamite. They were supposed to explode with light."

André Derain Signature

Summary of André Derain

André Derain had a major role in the development of two of the most significant artistic movements of the early-20th century. He, Henri Matisse, and Maurice de Vlaminck were responsible for generating works with a totally new style which would become Fauvism and his association with Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque was integral to early Cubism. Nevertheless, his contribution as the generator of the ideas behind these movements is constantly debated, and some consider his work derivative. This is due in part to the fact that, continually in search of artistic meaning and attempting to create a timeless art removed from the specificity of the modern age, he experimented with different stylistic idioms. Whichever side of the Derain debate you end up on, we can all appreciate his use of expressive vibrant color, his simplification of form, and his fascination with primitive art were constants throughout his work and played a major role in the creation and propagation of early Modern Art.

Key Ideas

Derain was one of the founders of the Fauve artistic movement along with Matisse. Although fascinated by the world around him, a popular subject among contemporary artists, he wanted to give a much greater appreciation to the expressionistic qualities of paint. His works are characterized by dense, vibrant brushworks that attract the viewer's attention as much as the subject itself.
Derain's interest in primitive masks began after viewing those exhibited at the Negro Museum in London, and he was one of the first to collect tribal art from Africa. It is likely that he was responsible for the interest in primitive elements espoused by Cubist artists such as Picasso and Braque. Derain was briefly interested in Cubist stylistic elements himself but his stylistic exploration of it was very brief.
Derain's search for an art that didn't need context to be of value, that would have a meaning for any generation, aligned him with the school of Symbolism. His decorative paintings describing the beauty of nature and individuals enjoying that nature differ significantly from those by the Impressionists before him who tried to depict modern life more realistically. His focus is more the beauty of what is described on the canvas, regardless of specifics. This generality denoted an inclination toward the idealism of Classical Art.
The Nazi Regime was especially attracted to Derain's later embrace of a Classical style, the embrace of Greek grandeur suiting their own claim to superior roots. Yet his alignment with the Nazi party during their occupation of France earned him a questionable place in the history of modern painting, forever compromising his revolutionary contributions.
André Derain Photo

André Derain was born in the Parisian suburb of Chatou. He grew up in a middle-class family. His father worked as a pastry chef and served as a municipal councilor.

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