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Jean-Michel Basquiat

American Painter

Jean-Michel Basquiat Photo
Born: December 22, 1960
Brooklyn, New York
Died: August 12, 1988
New York, New York, USA
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Believe it or not, I can actually draw.
Jean-Michel Basquiat Signature

Summary of Jean-Michel Basquiat

Jean-Michel Basquiat emerged from the "Punk" scene in New York as a gritty, street-smart graffiti artist who successfully crossed over from his "downtown" origins to the international art gallery circuit. In a few fast-paced years, Basquiat swiftly rose to become one of the most celebrated, and possibly most commercially exploited American "naif" painters of the widely celebrated Neo-Expressionism art movement.

Key Ideas

Biography of Jean-Michel Basquiat

In just a few years, Basquait became a star. He is revered to this day, as can be seen in this recreation of his famous portrait. Photo from the Pasadena Chalk Festival (2013).

"I wanted to be a star, not a gallery mascot" he said, and ultimately his life echos this rise and struggle, and gives insight into the unique origins and direction in his art.

Important Art by Jean-Michel Basquiat

SAMO Graffiti (1980)

SAMO Graffiti (1980)

Citing artistic differences, Al Diaz and Basquiat chose to sever their artistic collaboration, SAMO, with this three-word announcement. Carried out episodically at various cites as a piece of ephemeral graffiti art, the phrase surfaced repeatedly on gritty buildings throughout Lower Manhattan. At one time a sign of trespassing and vandalism, graffiti in the hands of Diaz and Basquiat became a tool of artistic "branding"; repeated here and there throughout the billboard-dotted city, "SAMO is Dead" slowly took on the status of a corporate mantra, such as, for instance, Coca Cola's "It's the Real Thing".

Untitled (Skull) (1981)

Untitled (Skull) (1981)

An example of Basquiat's early canvas-based work, Untitled (Skull) features a patchwork skull that seems the pictorial equivalent of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - a sum of incongruent parts. Suspended before a New York City subway map-like background, the skull is at once a contemporary graffitist's riff on a long Western tradition of self portraiture and the "signature piece" of some anonymous, streetwise miscreant. Basquiat's recent past as a gritty curbside peddler, virtually homeless floater, and occasional nightclub interloper are all equally stamped into this troubled three-quarter profile, making for a world-weary icon of the displaced Puerto-Rican and Haitian immigrant Basquiat forever seemed to remain even while successfully navigating the newly gentrified streets that were 1980s SoHo.

Untitled (1982)

Untitled (1982)

Like a page pulled cleanly from a daily artist's journal, this untitled canvas features Basquiat's personal iconography, some reminiscent of that of Paul Klee. Boldy appropriating images commonly associated with African art - a skull, a bone, an arrow - Basquiat modernizes them with his Neo-Expressionist style of thickly applied paint, rapidly rendered subjects, and scrawled linear characters, all of which float loosely across the pictorial field, as though hallucinatory. A white skull juts from the center of the ebony composition, vividly recalling a revered painter's tradition of the memento mori - a reminder of the ephemeral nature of all life and the body's eventual, merciless degeneration. Basquiat demonstrates in one concise "study" how he is able to carry on an ancient practice of painting "still life", all the while suggesting, as does a great jazz musician, that the artist's work was relatively effortless, if not completely improvisatory.

More Important Art
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Content compiled and written by Bonnie Rosenberg

Edited and published by The Art Story Contributors

"Jean-Michel Basquiat Artist Overview and Analysis". [Internet]. . TheArtStory.org
Content compiled and written by Bonnie Rosenberg
Edited and published by The Art Story Contributors
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First published on 22 Nov 2011. Updated and modified regularly
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