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Artists Reginald Marsh

Reginald Marsh

American Painter and Photographer

Reginald Marsh Photo
Movement: Social Realism

Born: March 14, 1898 - Paris, France

Died: July 3, 1954 - Dorset, Vermont

"Well-bred people are no fun to paint. I'd rather paint an old suit of clothes than a new one because an old one has character, reality is exposed and not disguised. People of wealth spend money to disguise themselves."

Synopsis

Marsh was a keen observer of people and his exuberant, documentary style paintings are unique in their focus on crowds rather than individuals. Painting in the 1930s and 40s, Marsh portrayed a city undergoing radical social and economic change through the Depression, the altering role of women in society, and the onset of the Second World War. An urban realist, he was fascinated with populist activities including the amusements of Coney Island, burlesque shows, and dance halls, Marsh chronicled the daily lives of working class New Yorkers, often representing the seedier side of the entertainments they enjoyed. Although stylistically modern, Marsh can be seen as the New York equivalent of artists and caricaturists such as William Hogarth (eighteenth-century London) and Honore Daumier (nineteenth-century Paris), painting what he saw but also offering elements of social commentary and occasional satire.

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